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Treatment-Resistant Depression


Treatment-Resistant Depression

October 24, 2022

When treating depression, physicians often prescribe a first-line anti-depressant (e.g., Zoloft, Prozac, and Lexapro). While these treatments work for many, a significant portion find that their symptoms remain even after trying several antidepressants. Known as treatment-resistant depression (TRD), this condition affects around 30 percent of adults with major depressive disorder (MDD).

 

Despite its prevalence, many are unaware of treatment-resistant depression, how to determine if they might have it, or what to do about it. 

 

Explore answers to these questions and more below.

When is Depression Treatment Resistant?

Treatment-resistant depression is generally defined as a lack of response to a few adequate trials of antidepressants. However, this leaves several questions open, including:

 

  • What counts as a lack of response?
  • What is an adequate trial?
  • How many antidepressants must a patient have tried?

It’s important to note that there are no universal answers to these questions. Instead of settling them, try answering the following questions:

 

  • Have your treatments failed to make you feel good?
  • Do you still not feel like your old self?
  • Have the side effects been difficult to manage?

Answering yes to any of these questions means you’re not getting the help you need, and it’s time to talk to your physician, who can decide the next best course of action. 

Risk Factors for Treatment-Resistant Depression

Though researchers are still uncovering all traits that can increase the chances of having or developing TRD, we know several factors are associated with the condition. In particular, depression is more likely to be treatment-resistant:

 

  • If it began at an early age
  • The longer one has had depression
  • The more frequent or longer lasting one’s depressive episodes are
  • When there are ongoing stressors
  • If one has other physical or mental health conditions

What to Do About Treatment-Resistant Depression

Treatment-resistant depression is treatable. Below are steps you and your physician can take to alleviate your depressive symptoms that haven’t responded to the first few treatments.

 

  • Confirm your diagnosis: Depression that co-occurs with or is caused by other mental health conditions may require a different treatment protocol. As a result, your physician should confirm your diagnosis if your depression isn’t improving in response to treatment.

 

  • Add on talk therapy: Medications often work best when combined with some form of talk therapy. If you find your depression hasn’t responded adequately to your antidepressants, adding on therapy can give them a boost and help alleviate symptoms.  

 

  • Change your medications: Just because a few medicines haven’t worked doesn’t mean none will. Newer anti-depressants (e.g., Spravato and Auvelity) that act on different neurotransmitters than first-line treatments can provide relief even when the standard solutions haven’t worked.

 

  • Try a non-medication-based intervention: While oral antidepressants are the most common medical treatment for depression, other options exist. For example, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive procedure where magnetic pulses are used to modulate activity in parts of the brain associated with mood regulation and is FDA approved for treatment-resistant depression.

How We Treat TRD at Heading Health

At Heading, we offer a comprehensive set of solutions to tackle TRD from every angle and provide rapid and sustained relief. We work hard to ensure that cost is not a barrier to accessing the interventions you need. We work with most insurance plans, from United Healthcare to Medicare to Blue Cross Blue Shield, and can provide coverage for all of our services, including ketamine, Spravato, and TMS, for most patients with TRD. Click here for a complete list of participating providers and to schedule a consultation to see whether our solutions are right for you. 

 

 

 

If you need to see a mental health professional or could use help deciding which service is right for you, please call us at 805-204-2502 or fill out an appointment request here. We have a wide variety of providers, including therapists, psychiatrists, nurse practitioners, and nutritional therapists, who can see you in as little as one day via teletherapy.  

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The Basics of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation


The Basics of Transcranial Magnetic Stiumulation

October 5, 2022

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive, drug-free procedure that uses magnetic coils to stimulate and influence the brain’s activity. Utilizing a unique mechanism entirely different from the standard array of psychiatric medications, TMS represents an important alternative for individuals who have not responded to other treatment options.

 

Below are answers to some common questions about TMS.

How Does TMS Work?

Most currently available medical treatments for psychiatric conditions require patients to ingest a drug that eventually enters the brain and alters its functioning in ways that alleviate symptoms of mental illness. For example, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, such as Prozac, Zoloft, and Lexapro, latch on to parts of neurons (tiny nerve cells in the brain) and prevent them from reabsorbing serotonin, a change which has been linked to improvements in anxiety, depression, and other conditions.

 

In contrast to these treatments, TMS is drug-free and noninvasive, meaning its active ingredient is not something that must be ingested or implanted. Instead, TMS impacts the brain from the outside. More specifically, it uses magnetic coils placed just above the scalp to send magnetic pulses into specific regions of the brain associated with mood regulation.

In turn, these pulses induce a series of changes in the brain that improve mood and alleviate symptoms of depression. As Latitia McDaniel, assistant TMS program director at Heading Health states:

 

By targeting these specific areas of the brain, TMS stimulates and strengthens these neural pathways. Like training a muscle, over time, the inactive signals begin firing and reconnecting properly again, thus restoring the emotional control center.

What is it Used to Treat?

TMS is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat the following conditions:

 

  • Major-depressive disorder (including treatment-resistant depression)
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)
  • Migraines
  • Smoking Cessation

 

In addition to being FDA-approved, treatment-resistant depression (i.e., depression that has not adequately responded to one or more antidepressant drugs) is now covered by several insurance companies. At Heading, we work with most insurance plans, from United Healthcare to Medicare to Blue Cross Blue Shield. Click here for a full list of participating providers and to schedule a consultation to determine whether TMS is covered for you. 

 

Aside from the above-mentioned conditions, researchers continue to examine whether TMS might be useful for other mental illnesses not currently approved by the FDA, including:

 

  • Bipolar disorder
  • Eating disorders
  • Generalized anxiety disorder
  • Panic disorder
  • Schizophrenia
  • Substance abuse
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder.

 

What is the Treatment Like?

TMS treatment for Major Depressive Disorder typically consists of three-minute or 20-minute sessions that occur five days a week over six weeks.

 

Undergoing TMS is a quick and straightforward process. At each appointment, patients sit in a relaxing chair as the practitioner places the magnetic coil in the correct location on their head. As the treatment begins, patients may feel a light tapping on their head that eventually dissipates. While rare, some individuals may feel some discomfort on their scalp, though this can be resolved by rotating or moving the magnetic coil or through other easy modifications.

 

After the session has ended, patients are free to drive home and continue their day as usual.

 

How Does Heading Health Do TMS Differently?

At Heading health, we focus on utilizing the best available tools to ensure our treatments are delivered precisely, reliably, and consistently.

 

One of the ways we accomplish this with TMS is with the Magstim StimGuide, the first navigational system specifically designed for the clinical market. After the target location has been identified, the StimGuide stores the location using four distinct parameters captured by a 3D snapshot of the treatment area. When administering TMS, this tool helps practitioners consistently identify the target area by emitting a green light when all four parameters are aligned.

 

In addition, our machines come outfitted with MagStim’s E-Z Cool Coil Coil, which has a built-in intelligence cooling system capable of at least a 37-minute protocol.  

 

Talk with your doctor to determine whether this treatment is right for you, or you can schedule an appointment with one of our team of psychiatrists or therapists to advise you on this or any other potential treatments for depression, including ketamine, Spravato, and TMS. Call us at 805-204-2502 or request an appointment here.

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Want to find out if Heading is right for you? 

Complete our consultation form and an intake specialist will get in touch.


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